Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘windows’

Here’s a beautiful room that reminds me of summer. I love the dark wood floors, the white walls and furniture, the wood accents (coffee table and chair arms), the fireplace, and the wall of windows. This is a great example of bringing nature inside your home. Isn’t it inviting? The pet dog seems happy enough.

#
Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Autumn Beauty

On Tuesday I spent the afternoon with a friend. We walked around Lake of the Isles. The crimson and golden hues presented plenty of photo opportunities. Here’s are some photos from the afternoon walk. Big thanks to my friend for stopping and waiting for me to capture all the images.

Read Full Post »

Weekly Photo Challenge: Fleeting Moment
May 29, 2012

Minneapolis Public Library in downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota

Setting the table at D’Amico Kitchen restaurant in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Children playing in a tree next to Lake Minnetonka

Learn more about the Weekly Photo Challenge: Fleeting Moment.

###

Read Full Post »

A Showcase Series of Dining Rooms

– Dining Room 1 –

This dining room is surrounded by glass on three sides and features a vaulted ceiling. The view provides a relaxing ambiance.

###

Read Full Post »

Photo of the Day
March 23, 2012

Yesterday’s post showed a home by the wetlands, shrouded in mist. Today’s photo shows a home in the woods. Which do you prefer?

#

.

Read Full Post »

The Pink Victorian

I always seem to notice pink homes. Perhaps it’s because they are rare. What sort of person lives in a pink house? Creative? Confident? Artistic? Fun? Bold? Gentle? Caring? Content? Blissful? Loving? Sweet?


What if I wrote those same adjectives in another way:

Creative.
Confident.
Artistic.
Fun.
Bold.
Gentle.
Caring.
Content.
Blissful.
Loving.
Sweet.


If a home is going to be pink, it needs to be the right shade and hue of pink. This Victorian wears its pink well. Some homes will wear pink better than others. Victorians, yes. Cottages, yes. These styles generally have some architectural detailing that works well with pink. Your basic 1950’s rambler? Probably not so much.

Locale makes a difference. Southern states may have more of these pink homes than northern states. This home is here in the northern state of Minnesota. I get the sense winter wouldn’t be quite so dreary coming home to a pink house.


Landscaping can make a difference as well. Note the variety of landscaping here that softens the overall ambiance.



Would you live in a pink house?

I would.

.

~~~

Read Full Post »

Energy Efficiency: Pick Upgrades that (Actually) Drive Down Costs

By: Lisa Kaplan Gordon

Published: November 3, 2011

The award winning energy efficient Devonshire ...

Image via Wikipedia

The award-winning energy-efficient Devonshire building
.

A new study says home owners won’t see their utility bills drop until they’ve conducted four or more energy upgrades. Here are projects that will give you the greatest bang for your energy buck.

I’ve long suspected that saving energy is like saving calories: Small measures add up, until a Thanksgiving pecan pie — or a dazzling holiday light display — wrecks a year’s worth of small though consistent efforts.

Evidently I’m right, according to a new study claiming that doing a couple of small, energy-saving measures actually increase utility bills. And that a home owner must perform at least four energy upgrades before their utility bill drops.

Look for this logo when considering your new r...

Image via Wikipedia

The 450-page study, conducted by the eco-curious Shelton Group, found that energy-efficient home owners think they should replace water heaters and install a higher-efficiency HVAC system, though they actually replace windows and add insulation.

We think they’re half right: Adding insulation, especially in the attic, is a low-cost way to reduce utility bills. But replacing windows requires a huge upfront cost, which you probably won’t live long enough to earn back.

To see net-net savings — in your lifetime — select upgrades that reduce energy consumption by 5% and require modest initial investments. We suggest:

  • Seal and insulate ductwork through unfinished and unheated areas, such as the attic, garage, and crawl spaces.
  • Install a programmable thermostat so you don’t overheat your house when you’re away or asleep.
  • Seal air leaks around windows, doors, attic access, and recessed lights.

How many energy-efficient improvements did you make last year? Did you see a drop or increase in your utility bills?

~~~

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »