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Posts Tagged ‘National Register of Historic Places’

City of Paris 1900

Long ago there was the City of Paris Dry Goods Company. It later became the City of Paris, an important department store in San Francisco from 1850 to 1974. The building survived the 1906 earthquake and fire but sustained damage. The interior remodel was redesigned by John Bakewell, Arthur J. Brown and Louis Bourgeois, graduates of the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris. It was rebuilt with a central, elliptical rotunda that was capped with a stained-glass dome. The skylit dome incorporates the store’s nautical origin and motto, Fluctuat nec mergitur(It floats but never sinks).

Dome SFL B&W

Detail 2

Detail 3

A forty-foot live Christmas tree was placed in the rotunda each year. The front doors of the store were specially designed to be removed and this allowed for an opening large enough for the tree to fit through. The tree was brought in, set up and decorated all in the same night. Staff and their families would help decorate. Scaffolding was placed around the tree to facilitate decorating it. Further reading reveals that the tree would be put outside on the sidewalk on January 2nd and one could walk by it and really get a sense of its size.

People familiar with the store recall the tree as beautiful and have very fond memories of their visits. I recall a similar large tree in the six-story atrium of the Marshall Field’s store in downtown Chicago. This atrium was topped by a Tiffany dome and the tree was known as the “Great Tree”. It was a wondrous sight, particularly to small children. It soared and filled the atrium space vertically. You can see a photo of the atrium here: Marshall Field’s Atrium

Christmas Tree SFL B&W

Christmas Tree in Rotunda SFL

Here are a couple of additional interior images.

Interior 2 City of Paris SFL

Interior City of Paris SFL

What a beauty. It was listed in The National Register of Historic Places as a California Historical Landmark. Alas, this fact and a protracted preservation campaign that went on for several years did not prevent it from being demolished in 1981 by the new owners, Neiman Marcus. The stained-glass dome was restored and preserved by the new owners. It has been reinstalled as part of the store’s entry and Rotunda Restaurant.

The new Neiman Marcus building was designed by postmodernist architect Philip Johnson. I haven’t seen the building in person. I don’t know that I would like seeing the elegant and beautiful dome inside a modern box. What about you?
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See this page for a photo of the current Neiman-Marcus building: California Historical Landmark – Noehill

Read an excerpt from a New York Times article here: NYTimes Excerpt – Review of Neiman Marcus

Wikipedia entry: City of Paris Dry Goods Co.
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In closing, I leave you with these words from Marshall Field & Company:

To do the right thing, at the right time, in the right way;
to do some things better than they were done before – 
The Marshall Field & Company idea.

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Photo of the Day
March 21, 2011

The Prospect Park Water Tower was designed by Frederick William Cappelen and constructed of concrete in 1913 at Tower Hill Park. It was given the nickname “Witch’s Hat” due to its green tile conical roof. It’s easily visible from I-94 since it soars up above the tree tops and has that uniquely shaped roof. For years I wondered exactly where it was located. I now know it’s at 55 Malcolm Avenue SE.

Directly below the roof is an octagonal Romanesque-arched belvedere with panoramic views of the city.  The interior of the tower is open to the public just one day a year on the first Friday in June. I haven’t had the pleasure of going inside yet. Maybe this year.

The tower is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
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Hanging Garden

Global Tree Project

I came across this image on another blog and was immediately struck by the beauty and spirituality it portrays. This abandoned space, Holy Cross Church in Mount Adams, Cincinnati, Ohio, is on the National Register of Historic Places. It’s beauty is still so evident even while it is fading from neglect. To me, this Hanging Garden breathes new life into the space, awakening hope, opening eyes to the beauty within its walls, creating a sanctuary once again, calling for a restoration of this 19th century church to its full magnificence–so like nature herself.

“Developing my Global Tree Project HANGING GARDEN at Holy Cross Church,” says Turner-Yamamoto, “I was drawn to debris in the abandoned church where pieces of fallen plaster and paint fragments melded with age-old dust. The material reminded me of the ruins I saw in Italy. It presented an extreme and insistent form of reconciliation between human and nature.”

“I found beauty in the decay of the church,” says Turner-Yamamoto. “There’s a beauty in how things crack. You can see nature’s power. It’s like looking at a bolt of lightning—it’s the same for me.”

Art installation and photos by Shinji Turner-Yamamoto

GlobalTreeProject.org – Press Release

yamamotoshinji.net

The artist Turner-Yamamoto discusses the project on this video:

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Bridge Photo for September 15, 2010

The Stillwater Lift Bridge

Built in 1931.
Listed on the National Register of Historical Places in 1989.

The Stillwater Bridge is a rare surviving example of vertical-lift highway bridge construction of the Waddell and Harrington type. It spans about 1050 feet. Six vertical-lift bridges were built in Minnesota and Wisconsin prior to World War II; The Stillwater Bridge is one of three remaining in existence today. The vertical-lift span operates during the May to October navigation season.

Click on any photo below to see it larger.

And the vertical-lift is up!

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Learn more about the historic Stillwater Bridge at the Minnesota Historical Society website: Minnesota Historical Society

More articles on the bridge and Stillwater:

What’s ahead for the St. Croix River and the Stillwater Bridge:
St. Croix River Crossing Project

Wikipedia Article on the Stillwater Bridge

The bridge may one day get new life as a pedestrian and bicycle bridge, along with a return to its original colors of deep green and silver.

If you plan to visit Stillwater, check here to learn more:
Greater Stillwater Chamber of Commerce

Related Posts:

Should This Bridge be Saved? — The St. Anthony Parkway Bridge in NE Mpls

“Hump Day” Now Seen in a Whole New Way — Let’s Declare Wednesday “Bridge Day”

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Grain Belt Brewery Gate

The former brewery is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
The seven structures that contribute to the listing in the National Register of Historic Places are an architectural treat and worth the trip to see.


This gate is located next to the former brewhouse (now home to RSP Architects)
and the former wagon house and shed (now home to the Pierre Bottineau
Branch of Hennepin County Library) in Northeast Minneapolis.

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St. Anthony Parkway Bridge in Northeast Minneapolis, Minnesota

St. Anthony Parkway Bridge

I imagine that plenty of people would look at this bridge and see nothing very attractive. I invite you to drive, walk or bike over it and see if your perception of it changes. I crossed over it earlier this evening and was immediately struck by its design and its rustic, artistic beauty. I admit that the visually historic aspect also brought me delight. Yes, I can be a sucker for old stuff. And for preserving parts of our architectural heritage.

This bridge is a five-span, Warren through truss bridge measuring 533.6 feet in length. It was built in 1925 and passes over 24 tracks of the Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) Rail yard. The bridge currently provides one lane of traffic in each direction and a sidewalk on the south side.

While I was photographing the bridge, I saw a gentleman standing on the sidewalk admiring the view of the trains, the tracks and the downtown skyline in the distance. I wonder if he is aware of the future of this bridge. Is he enjoying it while he can?

At this time, it appears to be nearly the end of the road for this bridge. A new bridge, known as the North Town Bridge, is slated to be built in its place during 2011-2012. The construction project for the new bridge will also include approach roadways (St. Anthony Parkway, California St NE and possibly Main St NE) and separate bike lanes.

The current bridge has been determined eligible for the National Register of Historic Places. It’s also part of the Minneapolis Parks and Recreation Board “Grand Rounds—National Scenic Byway”. Should this bridge be placed on the National Register of Historic Places so that it can become a permanent part of the National Scenic Byway? Is this a bridge you’d enjoy biking and walking over as part of your trip around the cities?

Should this bridge be saved or replaced?

I’d love to know your thoughts.
Feel free to share them by clicking on Leave a Comment below.
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Or take the poll:

 


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More on biking, the scenic Grand Rounds, and things to do and see in the Twin Cities:

Soak up the scenery on the beautiful Grand Rounds—Biking in Minneapolis

Grand Rounds National Scenic Byway Home Page—MinneapolisParks.org

National Scenic Byways Program—Grand Rounds Scenic Byway Information

 

List of Truss Types

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